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Alcoholics Anonymous

“And acceptance is the answer to all my problems today.”

 

Several studies have found that people who participate in mutual support programs are more likely to stay sober than those who choose to quit “on their own.” The sole purpose of A.A. is to help the alcoholic who wants to stop drinking and stay stopped.

 

AA members share their experiences with those seeking treatment for a drinking addiction, and they provide one-on-one service or “sponsorship” to alcoholics who come to AA from any source. The AA program, as outlined in the Twelve Steps, enables an addict to live a fulfilling life free of alcohol. At AA meetings, this curriculum is discussed.

 

Listening to each other’s stories helps alcoholics. When other addicts speak publicly about their abuse, alcoholics see their illness in the open. As a result, newcomers learn to let down their guard. This setting provides addicts with the ability to learn from one another in a comfortable environment.

 

A.A. Meetings

 

  • Who/what/when/where/why about AA meetings

AA meetings are easily accessible online at www.aa.org

 

 

Resources for AA meetings & information

www.aa.org

 

Sources:

https://www.verywellmind.com/what-is-alcoholics-anonymous-62612

https://www.rehab4alcoholism.com/latest-news/pros-and-cons-of-alcoholics-anonymous

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcoholics_Anonymous

 

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